Policies

CECV policies apply to all Victorian Catholic schools.

Our policies include sections that outline the rationale, principles, definitions, procedures and expected outcomes (and will clearly state when it is to be reviewed).

We are currently developing 'model' policies for schools to enable them to easily update their own school policies. The priority is on policies related to child safety, the minimum standards for school registration and compliance which schools are encouraged to adopt. 

Each of the four diocese has a range of policies and provides leadership and support to their Catholic schools in areas of policy formation and implementation.

Accreditation to Teach in a Catholic School

The Catholic school

A significant element in the overall mission of the Church in Victoria has been the establishment of Catholic schools.

The role of the Catholic school in educating people in faith continues to be given due recognition.1

The Church:

establishes her own schools because she considers them as a privileged means of promoting the whole person, since the school is a centre in which a specific concept of the world, of humanity and of history is developed and conveyed.2

This statement implies that education is an essential aspect of the proclamation of the Gospel message.

In each diocese, the ultimate responsibility for Catholic education carried out in schools rests with the diocesan bishop. It is shared in the proper manner with priests, parents, principals and staffs, members of religious institutes, students, Catholic Education Offices and other appropriate members of the school and parish communities.

The following quotation illustrates the importance of the role of the diocesan bishop in Catholic education:

The diocesan bishop has the right to watch over and inspect the Catholic schools situated in his territory, even those established or directed by members of religious institutes.

He has also the right to issue directives concerning the general regulation of Catholic schools; these directives apply also to schools conducted by members of a religious institute, although they retain their autonomy in the internal management of their schools.

The following excerpts from the documents of the Second Vatican Council and other relevant sources demonstrate how members of the Church work together in the exercise of their responsibilities.

1. The Bishop

Close collaboration and the coordination of all the apostolic works under the direction of the bishop should be promoted in the diocese as a whole or in parts of it.4

2. Parents, Principals and Teachers

It is the task of the whole educative community to ensure that a distinctive Christian educational environment is maintained in practice. The responsibility applies chiefly to Christian parents who confide their children to the school. An equally important role belongs to the teachers in safeguarding and developing the distinctive mission of the Catholic school, particularly with regard to the Christian atmosphere which should characterise its life and teaching.5

3. Teachers

Teachers must remember that it depends chiefly on them whether the Catholic school achieves its purpose. They should therefore be prepared for their work with special care, having the appropriate qualifications and adequate learning both religious and secular. They should also be skilled in the art of education in accordance with the discoveries of modern times.6

4. The Bishop and Teachers

. lay involvement in Catholic schools is an invitation to cooperate more closely with the apostolate of the bishops, both in the field of religious instruction and in more general religious education which they endeavour to promote by assisting the pupils to a personal integration of culture and faith and of faith and living. The Catholic school in this sense, therefore, receives from the bishops in some manner the mandate of an apostolic undertaking.7

5. Priests

The parish priest is the ecclesiastical administrator of the parish primary school. It is his obligation to provide for the catechetical instruction of the pupils in the school. The principal and the school staff cooperate with and assist him in the fulfilment of this obligation through the religious education program which is carried out in the school and which shall be in accord with diocesan policies and guidelines.

The parish priest has a key role in the parish primary school. This role may be described briefly as pastoral care. The parish priest is the pastor of the parish community of which the primary school is an integral part. He exercises his pastoral care by his presence, loyalty, encouragement and guidance to each member of the school community.8

In various ways priests also exercise their pastoral role in secondary schools which may be diocesan or regional colleges or schools administered by religious institutes.

6. Religious

The Church here is young. From her very foundation, she has been very active in developing organisations and the structures needed in order to provide a true Catholic education for her people, and at the same time to serve the needs of Australian society as a whole.

For many years, the chief organisational and teaching burdens for Catholic education here were shouldered by men and women religious. They met the challenge splendidly, and the whole Church and all of Australian society will be forever in their debt.9

Teachers who are members of religious institutes have already rendered an inestimable contribution to education in this country and, by responding faithfully to the needs of the contemporary Church, they continue to provide guidance and a pattern of Christian life for those whom they teach.

7. Lay Teachers

The active involvement of lay teachers in Catholic schools has enhanced the Church's commitment to education and deepened the evangelical thrust of the vocation given to all in Baptism.

It is important to emphasise that all teachers in the Catholic school are expected to share in its distinctive concerns. This statement follows from the understanding of education in the Catholic school and of the shared responsibility of the bishop and other members of the Church, which has already been outlined.

All teachers in Catholic schools possess an influence that can be vital to the character of Catholic education. In striving to fulfil their vocation, teachers may experience a degree of tension between the demands of their professional lives and the commitments and responsibilities of their personal lives. The challenge lies in striking a balance between the two areas.10

If the above quotations are kept in mind when the issue of accreditation is being addressed, then it will be clear that the Catholic Education Commission of Victoria is reiterating its policy of Accreditation to Teach in a Catholic School upon the foundation of a shared vision and sense of mission.

Finally, it is important to note that the distinctive element of the Catholic school is its basis in the life of Jesus Christ.

Christ is the foundation of the whole educational enterprise in a Catholic school. His revelation gives new meaning to life and helps people to direct their thoughts, actions and wills according to the gospel, making the beatitudes their norm of life. The fact that in their own individual ways all members of the school community share this Christian vision, makes the school 'Catholic'; principles of the gospel in this manner become the educational norms since the school then has them as its internal motivation and final goal.11

Thus all the members of the school derive their understanding of its educational purpose and vision from the person of Jesus Christ who continues to be present in and through his Church.

In pursuing a quality and type of education appropriate to this vision, the Church proclaims that teachers ought to recognise that the Catholic school depends very heavily on them to make its aims and studies effective. Teachers need careful preparation, suitable qualifications and appropriate opportunities for formation and updating in all the branches of knowledge which pertain to the exercise of their profession.12

Whatever their specific roles in a Catholic school, all teachers, by their presence in the school, contribute to its mission.

The meaning of accreditation to teach in a Catholic school

Accreditation to teach in a Catholic school is to be seen as the means of assisting all teachers in Catholic schools to develop a deeper understanding not only of the nature of the school as part of the Church's mission but also of their role as members of staff.

This policy of Accreditation to Teach in a Catholic School is applicable to Catholic primary and secondary schools in the dioceses of Victoria.13

The policy regarding Accreditation to Teach Religious Education in a Catholic School is Catholic Education Commission of Victoria Policy 1.7.

Rationale of accreditation to teach in a Catholic school

The Catholic Education Commission of Victoria is committed to the continuing development and the fostering of the Catholic character of the school community by means of a policy which calls for the appropriate development of staff.

Development of the school as a community should have primary emphasis. It should be apparent to all members of a school community that everyone shares the responsibility for such development.

As a part of its mission, an element proper to the school is solicitous care for the permanent professional and religious formation of its lay members. Lay people should be able to look to the school for the orientation and the assistance that they need, including the willingness to make time available when this is needed.14

The Commission believes that an understanding of the nature of the Catholic school enables the teacher to contribute positively to the goals of the school.

By their witness and their behaviour teachers are of the first importance to impart a distinctive character to Catholic schools. It is, therefore, indispensable to ensure their continuing formation through some form of suitable pastoral provision.15

In other words, emphasis should be laid on the continuous development of the person and the educational community.

Aims of accreditation to teach in a Catholic school

Through the policy of Accreditation to Teach in a Catholic School the Commission aims:

  1. to encourage the school community to provide regular in-service which would meet the criteria necessary for purposes of accreditation to teach in a Catholic school;
  2. to provide possibilities for formation through schools, institutions and other appropriate bodies;
  3. to encourage all teachers in Catholic schools to undertake additional suitable formation;
  4. to encourage principals and governing bodies to promote this ongoing formation;
  5. to help all teachers, whether teaching Religious Education or not, to contribute positively to the religious character of the school;
  6. to assure bishops, priests and parents that the Catholic character of the school is understood, appreciated, promoted and maintained by members of staff;
  7. to ensure that teachers have been involved in a formation that would enable them to contribute positively to the aims, objectives and goals of a Catholic school; and
  8. to ensure that Catholic education responds to new insights and new ways of bringing the Gospel to the processes of schooling.

The content areas of study for accreditation to teach in a Catholic school

The Commission would like to stress the importance of developing content areas of study for accreditation to teach in a Catholic school:

Formation is indispensable; without it, the school will wander further and further away from its objectives. Often enough, if it will join forces with other educational centres and with Catholic professional organisations, a Catholic school will not find it too difficult to organise conferences, seminars, and other meetings which will provide the needed formation.16

The Commission wishes to indicate the following criteria:

  1. that the fifty (50) hours of studies provide the basis for accreditation to teach in a Catholic school;
  2. that the studies include coverage of each of the areas:
    a. child, adolescent and adult faith development (a minimum of 10 hours),
    b. the aims, objectives and rationale of the Catholic school (a minimum of 10 hours),
    c. Revelation and the Catholic Church: Jesus Christ, Scripture, the Church in its Liturgy, Life and Tradition, Sacraments, Morality, Justice and Peace (a minimum of 15 hours);
  3. that a variety of ways be allowed for these studies:
    • school-based in-service activities
    • diocesan and regional seminars
    • formal courses.

Accreditation of teachers to teach in a Catholic school

Since it is vital for the effectiveness of the Catholic school community that all the members understand its purpose and mission, principals and teachers need to be accredited to teach in a Catholic school.

The Catholic Education Commission of Victoria wishes to promote every opportunity for encouraging, facilitating and assisting school communities in the development of their staffs.

To achieve this goal the Diocesan Catholic Education Offices and the existing associations of principals and staffs are asked to cooperate in the formulation of five-year plans for schools which would incorporate the variety of ways mentioned in point 3 above.

Applications from individual teachers for accreditation to teach in a Catholic school are administered by the respective diocesan Catholic Education Office. Certification of this accreditation is granted by the Catholic Education Commission of Victoria.

Applications for approval of school-based in-services for the purposes of accreditation to teach in a Catholic school are administered for the Catholic Education Commission of Victoria by the respective Diocesan Catholic Education Office according to the criteria agreed to by the Commission.

If teachers enter Catholic education without being accredited to teach in a Catholic school then they will be urged to become accredited within a period of five years from the commencement of employment.

The joint responsibility of both the principal and the teacher with regard to accreditation to teach in a Catholic school should be clearly stated in writing when a teacher enters service in a Catholic school.

Given the aims and vision of the Catholic school which have been outlined under the heading 'The Catholic school' in the introductory section to this policy, it is clear that teachers who are Catholics and those who are not Catholics may be accredited to teach in a Catholic school.

Reciprocity of accreditation to teach in a Catholic school

There is reciprocity of accreditation to teach in a Catholic school across all Catholic schools.

Applying for accreditation to teach in a Catholic school

Teachers, having completed the above requirements, should apply to the Catholic Education Commission of Victoria, through the appropriate diocesan Catholic Education Office, for certification of accreditation to teach in a Catholic school.

CECV February 1997

Endnotes

1 cf. Catholic Church, Congregation for Catholic Education, The Catholic School, St Paul Publications, Homebush, NSW, 1977, n. 9.
2 ibid., n. 8.
3 The Code of Canon Law, Collins, Sydney, 1983, Canon 806:1.
4 Catholic Church, Vatican II (1962-1965), 'Decree on the Pastoral Office of Bishops in the Church' (Christus Dominus), in Vatican Council II: The Conciliar and Post Conciliar Documents, ed. Austin Flannery OP, Costello Publishing Company, New York, 1975, n. 17.
5 Catholic Church, Congregation for Catholic Education, The Catholic School, op. cit., n. 73.
6 Catholic Church, Vatican II (1962-1965), 'Declaration on Christian Education' (Gravissimum Educationis), in Vatican Council II: The Conciliar and Post Conciliar Documents, ed. Austin Flannery OP, op. cit., n. 8.
7 Catholic Church, Congregation for Catholic Education, The Catholic School, op. cit., n. 71.
8 cf. Catholic Education Office of Victoria, Parish Primary School Handbook, 1978, p. 3.
9 The Pope in Australia: Collected Homilies and Talks, St Paul Publications, Homebush, NSW, 1986, p. 122.
10 cf. Catholic Church, Congregation for Catholic Education, Lay Catholics in Schools: Witnesses to Faith, St Paul Publications, Homebush, NSW, 1982, n. 37.
11 Catholic Church, Congregation for Catholic Education, The Catholic School, op. cit., n. 34.
12 cf. Catholic Church, Vatican II (1962-1965), 'Declaration on Christian Education' (Gravissimum Educationis), op. cit., n. 8.
13. Historically, the processes of accreditation to teach in a Catholic school in parish primary schools and Catholic secondary schools have operated differently. From 1 January 1977, primary teachers were required to hold a Certificate of Accreditation to Teach, or to agree to meet the requirements of accreditation to teach in a Catholic school within a reasonable period of time, in order to be covered by the provisions accorded to full-time teachers as stated in the section on dismissal in clause 3.17 of the Parish Primary School Handbook, 1978. From February 1983, secondary teachers, if eligible, were encouraged to obtain a Certificate of Accreditation to Teach in a Catholic school, or to take steps to qualify for accreditation. Principals were urged to ensure that a sufficient number of teachers on their staffs be accredited.
14 Catholic Church, Congregation for Catholic Education, Lay Catholics in Schools: Witnesses to Faith, op. cit., n. 79.
15 Catholic Church, Congregation for Catholic Education, The Catholic School, op. cit., n. 78.
16 Catholic Church, Congregation for Catholic Education, Lay Catholics in Schools: Witnesses to Faith, op. cit., n. 9.

 

Accreditation to Teach Religious Education in a Catholic School

Introduction

This policy is to be read in conjunction with the policy: Accreditation To Teach In a Catholic School (Catholic Education Commission of Victoria Policy 1.6). That policy emphasises the responsibility of the diocesan bishop for Catholic education and the cooperation of all parties: clergy, principals, teachers, religious, parents and students in making it an integral part of the Church's mission to proclaim the Gospel to all people.

This policy builds on and complements the policy: Accreditation to Teach in a Catholic School (Catholic Education Commission of Victoria Policy 1.6). It highlights the centrality of Religious Education in the aims and purposes of the Catholic school and the need for a high standard of Religious Education in principals, religious education coordinators and teachers of Religious Education. It will also assist teachers in the future appreciation of their role in Religious Education.

The Commission believes that its previous policies: Accreditation to Teach in a Catholic School, formulated in 1977 for primary school teachers and in 1983 for the secondary school teachers, have enabled them to have a greater understanding of and involvement in the Religious Education program of a school. The policies have helped all parties to work together to ensure a high standard of involvement and teaching in Catholic schools, and to enhance the development of faith at the personal and professional levels amongst all staff.

Aims of this policy

This policy aims to consolidate the previous policy statements as well as to address some of the following issues:

  • the place of Religious Education in the Catholic school;
  • the role of the principal in assisting teachers to be accredited to teach Religious Education.

Religious Education in the Catholic school – some issues

Some of the issues raised in the teaching of Religious Education in schools are:

the critical significance of the cooperation of all parties involved in Religious Education (cf. Accreditation to Teach in a Catholic School, CECV Policy 1.6);
the challenge of teaching Religious Education;
the necessity of a coordinated and regular program of Religious Education, with a competent and confident teacher;
the difficulty for teachers with many commitments and isolation in country areas to be fully involved in in-service activities;
the co-responsibility of the principal for the development of Religious Education in the school;
the need for the principal and religious education coordinator to work closely together;
the role of religious education coordination in relation to other subject coordination within the structure of the school;
the development of competence and confidence through the acquisition of skills in the development of the Religious Education curriculum, the use of resources and opportunities for in-service;
the need for adequate release time and adequate formation for teachers of Religious Education in relation to demands on their commitment and generosity;
the call of principals and experienced teachers to help those less experienced in the teaching of Religious Education;
the critical significance of the personal faith development of each student and teacher;
the rewarding and frustrating challenges to teachers of Religious Education which come from awareness of the personal faith development of students and themselves.

The complexity of Religious Education in the Catholic school

The Commission recognises the complexity of any exclusive definition of Religious Education, especially in the light of the differing needs of teachers and students. The following quotations are offered to stimulate reflection and to set a perspective for further discussion and comment. The policy Accreditation to Teach in a Catholic School also offers relevant passages for comment.

Evangelisation

For the Church, evangelising means bringing the Good News into all the strata of humanity, and through its influence transforming humanity from within and making it new …

… for the Church it is a question not only of preaching the gospel in ever wider geographic areas or to ever greater numbers of people, but also of affecting and as it were upsetting, through the power of the gospel, [human] criteria of judgment, determining values, points of interest, lines of thought, sources of inspiration and models of life, which are in contrast with the Word of God and the plan of salvation …

… what matters is to evangelise human culture and cultures … always taking the person as one’s starting point and always coming back to the relationships of people among themselves and with God.1

Catechesis

… at the heart of catechesis we find, in essence, a person, the person of Jesus of Nazareth …

The primary and essential object of catechesis is, to use an expression dear to Saint Paul and also to contemporary theology, ‘the mystery of Christ’.

… catechesis always has been and always will be a work for which the whole Church must feel responsible and must wish to be responsible.2

The setting for Religious Education in the school

A Christian formation process might therefore be described as an organic set of elements with a single purpose: the gradual development of every capability of every student, enabling each one to attain an integral formation within a context that includes the Christian religious dimension and recognises the help of grace.

… The religious teacher is the key, the vital component, if the educational goals of the school are to be achieved. But the effectiveness of religious instruction is closely tied to the personal witness given by the teacher; this witness is what brings the content of the lessons to life.3

Goals of Religious Education

When Religious Education is offered in the service of the Church, it has faith as a point of reference. Thus the goals of Religious Education are concerned with the development of faith. In working towards these goals, the Church is concerned with a process of Religious Education which respects the appropriate readiness for and stage of development in faith. In this understanding … Religious Education (is) concerned for the development of faith, situated in the life of the Church, and based on the following foundational beliefs:

  • Religious Education is concerned primarily with the Good News of Jesus Christ.
  • Religious Education is an essential function of the Church.
  • Religious Education occurs in a community, as a development of the new life of Baptism.
  • The sources of Religious Education are the expressions of God’s revelation in Scripture, Tradition, liturgy and life.
  • Religious Education is concerned with the development of relationships and is addressed much more broadly than in Religious Education classes and lessons only.
  • Religious Education teachers have a leadership role in the Church.
  • The skills of discovery, wonder and reflection are needed by those involved in Religious Education.
  • Religious Education is an educational process that is both comprehensive and systematic.

Religious Education is seen as an area in the curriculum which brings together many other disciplines and aspects of life, integrating these in a context of faith. In 1979, the Fifth Synod of Bishops on catechesis called for a synthesis of faith and life, so that the realities and insights of faith might transform the lives of believers and build up the world in which they live. Religious Education enables people to enter into the wonderful mystery of God. It fosters a sense of belonging in the life of the Church through relationship with Jesus Christ, with others, and in God’s world by assisting students to understand and participate in the process of revelation and faith.4

Strictly speaking, evangelisation is ‘that first announcement of salvation to some who, for various reasons, have no knowledge of it, or do not yet believe in it’ (REF 25), whereas ‘catechesis is intended for those who have made, even implicitly, the fundamental choice of Christ and his Church’ (REF 31). However since there is always an element of conversion in the life of faith, any form of catechesis involves evangelisation, which can precede or accompany the work which is more properly called catechesis (cf. GCD 18). In the same way, while Religious Education is a catechetical activity, it will also involve some elements of evangelisation.

Catechesis ‘has the two-fold objective of maturing the initial faith and of educating the true disciple of Christ by means of a deeper and more systematic knowledge of the person and the message of our Lord, Jesus Christ’ (CT 19). It is important to recognise that ‘this teaching is not a body of abstract truths. It is the communication of the living mystery of God.’5

‘Religious Education’ or ‘Education in Faith’ studies religion from the viewpoint of the adherent who is a believer. It is a process which involves reason, skills, knowledge and experience. It helps the adherents, student and teacher, to become familiar with the rich variety of religious experience, savour it, reflect on and analyse it and so to participate actively in it.

‘Religious Studies’ is the objective study of religion, which regards it as a phenomenon of human experience which requires no assumption of belief on the part of student or teacher. It emphasises the acquisition of information about religion.

In terms of personal development, catechesis is directed towards enabling the believer to grow in faith and commitment to Jesus Christ. Catechesis cannot be divorced from the Church missionary and pastoral activity since it is an education in faith, teaching Christian doctrine in an organic and systematic way. In this, people are initiated into the fullness of Christian life.6

Evangelisation, then, can both precede and accompany catechesis. Every form of catechesis must involve evangelisation.7

In light of the above, it seems essential that any religious educator in a Catholic school should have an appropriate and adequate knowledge of Catholic faith, tradition and practice in order to establish competently the necessary framework for the education of faith as outlined in the diocesan Guidelines for Religious Education. It is on this assumption that the policy which deals with accreditation to teach Religious Education in a Catholic school rests.

The means of accreditation to teach Religious Education in a Catholic school

Registered teachers may be accredited to teach Religious Education in a Catholic school when:

1. they have successfully completed a formal course and its assessment. This course should include a foundational unit in the Church’s history and teaching and units in Biblical Studies, Sacramental Theology and Religious Education method and practice. (Courses are approved by the agreement of the diocesan Directors of Catholic Education according to the above criteria.)

An applicant for accreditation to teach Religious Education in a Catholic school must provide satisfactory evidence of practical experience of the teaching of Religious Education in a classroom setting.

OR

2. they are primary school teachers who have been teaching Religious Education in Catholic schools in Australia before 1st January 1977, and

have regularly participated in approved Religious Education in-services during their teaching years, and
their principal recommends their application for accreditation to teach Religious Education in a Catholic school.

OR

3. they are primary school teachers who, during the period 1977–1989, were awarded a Certificate of Accreditation to Teach in a Catholic Primary School from the Catholic Education Commission of Victoria. (These teachers are accredited to teach Religious Education in a Catholic school and do not need to reapply.)

OR

4. they are secondary teachers who have been accredited to teach in a Catholic school or have been teaching in Catholic schools before 1 January 1977, and

have been teaching Religious Education in Catholic schools in Australia prior to 1983, and
have regularly participated in approved Religious Education in-services during their teaching years, and
their principal recommends their application for accreditation to teach Religious Education in a Catholic school.

OR

5. at the discretion of the diocesan Director of Religious Education and in accordance with the criteria set by the Catholic Education Commission of Victoria.

Exemption

Primary school teachers who have been teaching Religious Education in Catholic Schools in Australia before 1 January 1977 are exempt from the requirements of accreditation to teach Religious Education. In this instance no certificate is issued.

Reciprocity of accreditation to teach in a Catholic school

There is reciprocity of accreditation to teach Religious Education in a Catholic school across all Catholic schools.

Applying for accreditation to teach Religious Education in a Catholic school

Teachers, having completed the above requirements, should apply to the Catholic Education Commission of Victoria through the appropriate diocesan Catholic Education Office for certification of accreditation to teach Religious Education in a Catholic school.

CECV February 1997

Endnotes

1 Paul VI (Pope), Evangelii Nuntiandi, St Paul Publications, Homebush, NSW, 1976, ns 18, 19, 20.
2 John Paul II (Pope), Catechesi Tradendae, 2nd edition, St Paul Publications, Homebush, NSW, 1989, ns 5, 16. See also Catechism of the Catholic Church, St Pauls, Homebush NSW, 1994, n. 426.
3 Catholic Church, Congregation for Catholic Education, The Religious Dimension of Education in a Catholic School, St Paul Publications, Homebush, NSW, 1988, ns 99, 96.
4 Catholic Education Office, Melbourne, Guidelines for Religious Education of Students in the Archdiocese of Melbourne, Melbourne, 1995, pp. 13–14.
5 ibid., p. 13.
6 cf. John Paul II (Pope), Catechesi Tradendae, op. cit., n. 18.
7 cf. Sacred Congregation for the Clergy, General Catechetical Directory, 1971, n. 18.

Privacy Policy

Introduction

This Privacy Policy applies to the Catholic Education Commission of Victoria Ltd (CECV) and sets out how the CECV manages personal and sensitive information provided to it or collected by it.

In dealing with personal and sensitive information about individuals, the CECV is bound by the Australian Privacy Principles contained in the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth). In relation to health records, the CECV is also bound by the Health Records Act 2001 (Vic) and the Health Privacy Principles in that Act.

The CECV may, from time to time, review and update this Privacy Policy to take account of new laws and technology and changes to CECV operations and practices and to ensure the policy remains current in a changing environment.

What kinds of personal information does the CECV collect and how does the CECV collect it?

The CECV collects information from individuals to assist it to perform one of more of its functions or activities related to its work of advising and supporting Victorian Catholic schools. The type of information the CECV collects and holds includes (but is not limited to) personal information, including health and other sensitive information, about:

  • Students, parents and/or guardians (parents) before, during and after the course of a student’s enrolment at the school
  • Job applicants, staff members, volunteers and contractors
  • Other people who come into contact with the CECV. In the case of student and parent information, the schools collect this information on behalf of the CECV.
Personal information you provide:

The CECV will generally collect personal information held about an individual from forms filled out by the individual, face-to-face meetings and interviews, emails and telephone calls. On occasions, people other than the individual provide personal information.

Personal information provided by other people: In some circumstances the CECV may be provided with personal information about an individual from a third party, for example a report provided by a school or by a medical professional or a reference from another employer.

Information collected by CECV’s website

When you look at the CECV website, CECV’s Internet Service Provider makes a record of your visit and logs the following information for statistical purposes:

  • your server address
  • your top-level domain name (for example .com, .gov, .au, .uk, etc.)
  • the date and time of your visit to the site
  • the pages you accessed and documents downloaded
  • the previous site you have visited
  • the type of browser you are using.
Access to information collected

The CECV will not attempt to identify users by their browsing activities. However, in the unlikely event of an investigation, a law enforcement agency or other government agency may exercise its legal authority to inspect the CECV’s Internet Service Provider’s logs.

Use of information collected

The CECV will only record your email address if you send the CECV a message. Your email address will only be used for the purpose for which you have provided it and it will not be added to a mailing list or used for any other purpose without your consent.

The CECV’s website does not provide facilities for the secure transmission of information across the Internet. Users should be aware that there are inherent risks transmitting information across the Internet.

Cookies

The CECV’s website only uses session cookies and only during a search query of the website.

On closing your browser the session cookie set by the CECV’s website is destroyed and no personal information is retained which might identify you should you visit the CECV’s website at a later date.

Exception in relation to employee records

Under the Privacy Act the Australian Privacy Principles do not apply to an employee record. As a result, this Privacy Policy does not apply to the CECV’s treatment of an employee record, unless required by law or organisational policy, where the treatment is directly related to a current or former employment relationship between the CECV and an employee. The CECV handles staff health records in accordance with the Health Privacy Principles in the Health Records Act 2001 (Vic.).

How will the CECV use the personal information you provide?

The CECV will use personal information it collects from you for the primary purpose of collection, and for such other secondary purposes that are related to the primary purpose of collection and reasonably expected, or to which you have consented.

Students and Parents

The CECV uses the personal information of students and parents collected by the CECV or provided to the CECV to:

  • Assist with students’ learning and wellbeing
  • Satisfy the CECV’s accountability and legal obligations
Job applicants and contractors

In relation to personal information of job applicants and contractors, the CECV’s primary purpose of collection is to assess and engage a suitable applicant or contractor.

In addition, the CECV uses personal information of job applicants and contractors for the purpose of:

  • Administering the individual’s employment or contract
  • Insurance purposes;
  • Satisfying the CECV’s legal obligations, for example, in relation to child protection legislation.
Volunteers

The CECV may also obtain personal information about volunteers who assist the CECV in its functions or to conduct associated activities to enable the CECV to conduct its functions.

Marketing

The CECV undertakes marketing activities to promote the future growth and development of Victorian Catholic schools. The CECV may receive personal information held by a school for the CECV’s marketing purposes.

Who might the CECV disclose personal information to and store your information with?

The CECV may disclose personal information, including sensitive information, held about an individual to:

  • Victorian Catholic Education Offices
  • third party service providers that provide educational support or pastoral care services to schools and school systems including the Integrated Catholic Online Network system (ICON)
  • recipients of CECV publications, such as newsletters and magazines
  • anyone to whom we are required or authorised to disclose the information to by law.

The CECV may from time to time use the services of third party online service providers (including for the delivery of services and third party online applications, or Apps. These online service providers may be located in or outside Australia.

The CECV makes reasonable efforts to be satisfied about the protection and security of any personal information processed and stored outside Australia as not all countries are bound by laws which provide the same level of protection for personal information provided by the APPs.

Where CECV uses the servers of cloud service providers or other third party service providers, they will be located in countries which have substantially similar protections as the APPs.

Where personal and sensitive information is retained by a cloud service provider on behalf of CECV to facilitate educational and administrative support, this information will be stored on servers located within Australia. This includes the ICON system.

Sending and storing information overseas

The CECV may disclose personal information about an individual to overseas recipients, for instance, to facilitate a school exchange. However, the CECV will not send personal information about an individual outside Australia without:

  • your consent (in some cases this consent will be implied)
  • otherwise complying with the Australian Privacy Principles or other applicable privacy legislation.

How does the CECV treat sensitive information?

Sensitive information relating to a person’s racial or ethnic origin, political opinion, religion, trade union or other professional or trade association membership, philosophical beliefs, sexual orientation or criminal record will be used and disclosed only for the purpose for which it was provided or a directly related secondary purpose, unless you agree otherwise, or the use or disclosure of the sensitive information is allowed by law.

Management and security of personal information

The CECV respects the confidentiality of students' and parents' personal information and the privacy of individuals.

The CECV has various methods in place to protect the personal information it holds from misuse, interference, loss, unauthorised access, modification or disclosure. These include, but are not limited to, locked storage of paper records, access protocol, password protected computerised records, high level security measures and encryption.

Access and correction of personal information

Under the Commonwealth Privacy Act and Health Records Act 2001 (Vic) an individual has the right to obtain access to any personal information which the CECV holds about them and to advise the CECV of any perceived inaccuracy. There are some exceptions to this right set out in the Act. Students will generally be able to access and update their personal information through their Parents, but older students may seek access and correction themselves.

The exceptions to these rights set out in the applicable legislation

To make a request to access or update any personal information the CECV holds about you or your child, please refer to the contact details below.

The CECV may require you to verify your identity and specify what information you are seeking. The CECV may charge a fee to cover the cost of verifying your application and locating, retrieving, reviewing and copying any material requested. If the information sought is extensive, the CECV will advise the likely cost in advance. If the CECV cannot provide you with access to that information, we will provide you with a written notice explaining the reasons for refusal.

Consent and rights of access to the personal information of students

The CECV respects every parent's right to make decisions concerning their child's education.

Generally, the CECV will refer any requests for consent and notices in relation to the personal information of a student to the student's Parents. The CECV will treat consent given by parents as consent given on behalf of the student, and notice to parents will act as notice given to the student.

While parents may seek access to personal information held by the CECV about them or their child by contacting the CECV Chairman (see contact details below) there will be occasions when access is denied. Such occasions would include where release of the information would have an unreasonable impact on the privacy of others, or where the release may result in a breach of the CECV’s duty of care or other legal obligations to a staff member or student.

The CECV may, at its discretion, on the request of a student, grant that student access to information held by the CECV about them, or allow a student to give or withhold consent to the use of their personal information, independently of their Parents. Normally this would be done only when the maturity of the student and/or the student's personal circumstances warrant it.

Enquiries and complaints

If you would like further information about the way the CECV manages the personal information it holds, or wish to complain that you believe that the CECV has breached the Australian Privacy Principles, please contact the CECV.

CECV Chairman
Catholic Education Commission of Victoria Ltd (CECV)
PO Box 3 East Melbourne 8002
Phone 9267 0228
Email secretary@cecv.catholic.edu.au

The CECV will investigate any complaint and will notify you of a decision in relation to your complaint as soon as practicable after the decision has been made.

Updated 10 April 2017
Next Review March 2018